This is an old game. A noble game, unchanging across decades. It demands respect.

So I’m going to take great pleasure in giving it absolutely none, because even this Digital Edition for Steam […] is definitely still a board game from the 80s that plays like having your fingers broken by a copy of the Monster Manual.

Quintin Smith sums up my feelings about Talisman right here. Talisman: Digital Edition review • Reviews • PC • Eurogamer.ne

This is an old game. A noble game, unchanging across decades. It demands respect.

So I’m going to take great pleasure in giving it absolutely none, because even this Digital Edition for Steam […] is definitely still a board game from the 80s that plays like having your fingers broken by a copy of the Monster Manual.

Quintin Smith sums up my feelings about Talisman right here. Talisman: Digital Edition review • Reviews • PC • Eurogamer.ne

Watching a toddler is like watching an alien creature build some kind of extraterrestrial machine. It’s like watching ritually-peculiar Druid magic, or the interpretive dance of a sentient spam-bot. Our boy-human will put on an Indiana Jones hat and start calling himself “Nemo.” He’ll hand you things and then demand you hold them and if you try to give them back you’ve broken some ancient changeling contract. He’ll require a very particular truck and if you hand him one that is 95% the same truck, he’ll actually hate you — like, maybe literally hate you — for at least two minutes. (Then he’ll forget.) He’ll place things around the room or perform a sequence of events that, for all you know, is meant to unlock some kind of apocalypse. It’s methodical and maddening, like a bird building a nest out of watch parts. Other times? He’s not like that at all.

Watching a toddler is like watching an alien creature build some kind of extraterrestrial machine. It’s like watching ritually-peculiar Druid magic, or the interpretive dance of a sentient spam-bot. Our boy-human will put on an Indiana Jones hat and start calling himself “Nemo.” He’ll hand you things and then demand you hold them and if you try to give them back you’ve broken some ancient changeling contract. He’ll require a very particular truck and if you hand him one that is 95% the same truck, he’ll actually hate you — like, maybe literally hate you — for at least two minutes. (Then he’ll forget.) He’ll place things around the room or perform a sequence of events that, for all you know, is meant to unlock some kind of apocalypse. It’s methodical and maddening, like a bird building a nest out of watch parts. Other times? He’s not like that at all.

25 Things You Should Know About Life With A Toddler « terribleminds: chuck wendig